Who wears the REDD+ pants in Papua New Guinea? The actors, networks and coalitions shaping policies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Papua New Guinea.

Who wears the REDD+ pants in Papua New Guinea? The actors, networks and coalitions shaping policies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Papua New Guinea.

Thu, 08/08/2013 - 11:00


About the Presenter

Andrea Babon is a PhD candidate at the Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University. She is also working with the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) as part of their Global Comparative Study on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (GCS-REDD).

She is a proud geographer with an interest in the interface between people and the environment in developing countries. She worked for 10 years in the fields of community-based natural resource management and international development in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region, including Cambodia, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and Malaysia.


Venue

Charles Darwin University
Ellengowan Drive
Building Blue 5.1.01
Casuarina NT 0810
Australia

Tropical deforestation is responsible for an estimated 12-18% of global carbon emissions (van der Werf et al. 2009). Proposals for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation and enhancing forest carbon stocks (REDD+) have gained prominence in international climate change negotiations as a potentially easy and cost-efficient mitigation strategy.

Papua New Guinea has been a leading proponent of REDD+ at the international level but domestic progress on creating an enabling environment for REDD+ has been slow. My PhD research is part of a global comparative study on REDD+ being undertaken by the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) which examines national REDD+ policy processes across twelve countries. My research sought to map the network of policy actors that were engaged in REDD+ policy discussions in Papua New Guinea in 2011-2012.

The study is based on the understanding that, while politicians and state actors have final decision making power, policy emerges from a network of inter-dependent actors.  I find that the REDD+ policy network in Papua New Guinea includes a number of different stakeholder groups at different scales – local, national and international. While state actors at the national level are the most influential actors in the REDD+ policy network given their formal role in national policy processes, domestic civil society have been both influential and central in the REDD+ policy network.

I suggest REDD+ has strengthened a coalition of both state and non-state actors calling for transformational change in Papua New Guinea’s forest sector. However, this coalition is not powerful enough to challenge business-as-usual interests driving deforestation and forest degradation in Papua New Guinea. I conclude with an analysis of the potential pathways to transformational change in the county’s forest sector capable of delivering effective, efficient and equitable REDD+.

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