Remote sensing of surface water dynamics for environmental flows in the Murray-Darling Basin

Remote sensing of surface water dynamics for environmental flows in the Murray-Darling Basin

Tue, 22/04/2014 - 16:30 to Wed, 23/04/2014 - 16:00


About the Presenter

Dr Mirela Tulbure, Lecturer at the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW, Sydney

Dr Mirela Tulbure is an applied ecological remote sensing researcher. Mirela's work integrates ecological concepts with the application of spatial data, GIS analysis, remote sensing, and spatial statistics at broad spatial scales and over time. My irela's current research includes modelling surface water dynamics, climate change impacts on these dynamics and applications of graph theory to conservation planning. Mirela is a lecturer at the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW, Sydney.


Venue

Charles Darwin University
Ellengowan Drive
Building Red 6.1.10
Casuarina NT 0810
Australia

Surface water is a vital resource affected by changes in climate and anthropogenic factors (e.g., land use changes). Knowledge of surface water dynamics provides critical information for flood and drought management. Here we focused on the on the entire Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), a large semi-arid region with scarce water resources, high hydroclimatic variability and competing water demands, impacted by altered flow regimes and climate and land use changes. The MDB is also an area where substantial investment in environmental water allocation of large volumes of environmental flow has been made. We used Landsat TM data to synoptically map the extent and dynamic of surface water with an internally consistent algorithm and quantified the dynamics of surface water over decades. We concentrated on the largest river red gum forest in the world, a site with considerable focus on environmental flow and conservation management, to track the response of vegetation community condition to flooding in space and time. Results show high interannual variability in number and size of flooded areas. Vegetation community response to flooding varied in space and time and with vegetation types and densities.  Knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamic of flooding and the response of vegetation communities to flooding is important for management of floodplain wetlands and vegetation communities and for investigating effectiveness of environmental flows and flow regimes in the MDB.

Jump to NRBL themeJump to CMEM themeJump to FEM themeJump to SMWC themeJump to TRF themeJump to RIEL home

Innovative Research University

© 2011-2013 Charles Darwin University
Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods
Privacy Policy
CRICOS Provider No. 00300K | RTO Provider No. 0373

Phone (+61) 8 8946 6413
Email riel@cdu.edu.au