Weed invasion changes fuel characteristics: Para Grass (Urochloa mutica (Forssk.) T.Q. Nguyen) on a tropical floodplain

Weed invasion changes fuel characteristics: Para Grass (Urochloa mutica (Forssk.) T.Q. Nguyen) on a tropical floodplain

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsDouglas, MM, O'Connor, RA
JournalEcological Management and Restoration
Volume5
Issue2
Pagination143 - 145
Date Published01/01/04
ISSN1442-8903
Abstract

Invasive plants, particularly grasses, are regarded as one of the most serious threats to global biodiversity and ecosystem function. One of the most significant effects of exotic grass invasion is the increase in fine fuel, which can increase fire frequency, intensity and extent. In northern Australia, many terrestrial and aquatic grasses introduced for pastoralism are now recognized weeds (Lonsdale 1994). Para Grass (Urochloa mutica (Forssk.) T.Q. Nguyen), an African perennial, has been widely promoted throughout northern Australia as a pasture species but is also considered a serious weed which threatens large areas of wetland from northern NSW to WA (Humphries et al. 1991).

URLhttp://espace.cdu.edu.au/view/cdu:1577

Publications

RIEL Headlines

Pages

Jump to NRBL themeJump to CMEM themeJump to FEM themeJump to SMWC themeJump to TRF themeJump to RIEL home

Innovative Research University

© 2011-2013 Charles Darwin University
Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods
Privacy Policy
CRICOS Provider No. 00300K | RTO Provider No. 0373

Phone (+61) 8 8946 6413
Email riel@cdu.edu.au