Food, Energy, Water: Conflicting insecurities (and the rare win-wins offered by soil stewardship)

Food, Energy, Water: Conflicting insecurities (and the rare win-wins offered by soil stewardship)

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsCampbell, CAndrew
JournalJournal of Soil Conservation
Volume63
Issue5
Start Page149
Pagination149-151
Date Published09/2008
Keywordsenergy, External, food, soil stewardship, triple-helix, water
Abstract

P lanet Earth is experiencing environmental change of a scale and speed without precedent, driven by climate, human population growth, and changing consumption patterns. Food, water, and energy security are finally being recognized as the most important national and international security issues, but an important element has been lacking in the discussion--the soil. On its current trajectory, the world will need to at least double food production by 2050. We have doubled food production over similar periods in the past, mainly through clearing, cultivating, and irrigating more land, using improved varieties, and increasing use of fertilizer. Those options are narrowing. It now seems likely that food production by 2050 will have to be achieved using less land and water than is being used today. The current trend toward biofuels for energy security reasons further intensifies the squeeze on land and water resources.

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