Transformational adaptation of Primary Industries in remote northern Australia

Transformational adaptation of Primary Industries in remote northern Australia

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

In order to equip primary industries in remote northern Australia with sustainable, practical and effective options to adapt more effectively to climate change, an improved understanding and management of the risks and opportunities of taking or not taking transformative action is required.

A PhD top-up scholarship with CSIRO’s Climate Adaptation Flagship (CAF) is available related to Australian primary industries transforming to a changing climate. The PhD will need to be focused on remote northern Australia and linked to adaptation in agriculture.

 

ELIGIBILITY:

1.       In the past CAF has awarded top-up scholarships, not full scholarships. Students should have an APA or university equivalent.

2.       CAF prefers students who will commence their studies in 2014. We find we can’t provide as much guidance if the student is well underway in their studies.

3.       Though five priority areas are nominated, it is not until after the assessment of the quality of the students/projects is known and a ranking of students determined that we know how many scholarships will ultimately be offered. So please bear in mind that even though a student applies for one of these topics, a scholarship is not guaranteed.

 

SUBMISSION:

Students will submit their application electronically through Jobs Central portal, not directly to the CSIRO contact.

Follow the link to read more about this CSIRO flagship postgraduate scholarship and access the application form: http://www.csiro.au/Portals/Careers/Work-experience-and-scholarships/Pos...

 

CLOSING DATE:

Deadline for submissions is 15th November, 2013.

 

ENQUIRIES:

Dr. Anne-Maree Dowd, Project Supervisor and Senior Social Scientist, Science Into Society Group, Earth Sciences and Resource Engineering Division, CSIRO.

Email: anne-maree.dowd@csiro.au

RIEL Headlines

  • Thu, 14/11/2013

    A book detailing the devastating impact of one of Australia’s most successful invasive species and the lessons that can be learned from the “unintended consequences” of species’ introduction will be launched this week (Friday, 15 November).

  • Fri, 01/11/2013

    The great grandson of naturalist Charles Darwin will introduce “Charles Darwin, Evolution and Tropical Australia”, the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) created by Charles Darwin University and commencing on November 11.

  • Tue, 08/10/2013

    Representatives from across the Arafura and Timor seas have come together this week to share ideas about sustainable activities for the conservation and management of marine and coastal resources.

  • Thu, 12/09/2013

    A conservation biologist who has spent most of the past 35 years in tropical Australia will suggest that improvements in the listing processes and modifications to legislation could improve the targeting of threatened species investment.

  • Fri, 06/09/2013

    A research project investigating how fire affects the food source of one of northern Australia’s most iconic bird species could provide clues to its future conservation.

  • Cassie Scoble
    Fri, 16/08/2013

    New research funded through the Carbon Farming Initiative (CFI) will determine the feasibility of carbon farming through reforestation.

  • Thu, 15/08/2013

    As the debate continues to rage about prescribed burning, leading bushfire researchers from Charles Darwin University and around the world have contributed their perspectives in a series of papers published today.

  • Sat, 03/08/2013

    DEEP in the tropical savanna of Australia's far north lies an Aboriginal sacred place that could hold the clues to a mystery scientists have puzzled over for more than a century.

  • Thu, 01/08/2013

    A Charles Darwin University researcher has peered into the murky depths of the behaviour of Northern Australia’s most voracious predator finding their innate survival instinct begins from day one.

  • Tue, 02/07/2013

    New research has revealed that cane toads have wiped out some populations of dwarf crocodiles in northern Australia.
     

Pages

Jump to NRBL themeJump to CMEM themeJump to FEM themeJump to SMWC themeJump to TRF themeJump to RIEL home

Innovative Research University

© 2011-2013 Charles Darwin University
Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods
Privacy Policy
CRICOS Provider No. 00300K | RTO Provider No. 0373

Phone (+61) 8 8946 6413
Email riel@cdu.edu.au